intlwomenshealth

Israel is keeping up a steady stream of attacks on the besieged Gaza Strip, killing 11 more Palestinians in its latest airstrikes.

The air raids targeted four different locations in the coastal enclave. Officials say two of the victims were killed when a strike hit a facility for the disabled in Beit Lahiya in northern Gaza. Israel has pounded more than one thousand targets in the impoverished region since Tuesday. 119 Palestinians, most of them women and children, have lost their lives. And about 800 others have been injured. Tel Aviv has now massed thousands of troops along the Gaza border in preparation for a possible ground incursion.

kwamezulushabazz

stay-human:

I cannot recommend this video enough. This woman breaks it down perfectly.

The Stories That Europe Tells Itself About Its Colonial History

by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

“She said once she was shocked that her son while being taught Belgian history, was taught nothing about Congo. She said “They teach my son in school that he must help the poor Africans, but they don’t teach him about what Belgium did in Congo.” Of course, all countries are evasive about the past for which they feel ashamed, but I was shocked by what seemed to me not evasiveness but an erasure of history

If her son doesn’t learn that the modern Congo State began a hundred years ago as the personal property of a Belgian king, who was desperate to get wealthy from ivory and rubber, if her son doesn’t learn that the hands of Congolese people were chopped off for not producing enough resources to meet the king’s greed, if her son doesn’t learn that the Belgian government later led Congo with a deliberate emphasis on not producing an educated class, so that Congolese could become clerks and mechanics but couldn’t go to university, if her son doesn’t learn that more recently, even though it was the Americans who installed the Mobutu dictatorship, Belgium was a major force behind the scenes propping him up, if this young Belgian boy, knows nothing about these incidents, then, at some point, they would perhaps no longer have happened because the past after all is the past because we collectively acknowledged that it is so. 

This young Belgian boy would grow up to see Africa only as a place that requires his aid, his help, his charity with no complications for him. A place that can help him show how compassionate he can be, and most of all, a place whose present has no connection to Europe. 

It is not that Europe has denied its colonial history. Instead, Europe has developed a way of telling the story of its colonial history that ultimately seeks to erase that history”

archiemcphee

archiemcphee:

Russian carpenter Yuri Hvtisishvili created this awesome life-size wooden replica of the classic classic IL-49 Soviet motorcycle. It looks so perfect that, were it not for the telltale color, it’s hard to believe the bike is completely made of wood, even the tires. The project began ealier this year when business was slow at Yuri’s carpentry shop and he wanted to try something new. Inspired by an internet post about a master carpenter’s full-scale wooden replica of a motorcycle, he decided to create a replica of his favorite Russian motorcycle, the IL-49.

"Yuri started to work on the project on January 18; it was the perfect activity to pass his time during the long winter evenings. He patiently carved out the motorcycle one part at a time, down to the last nut and bolt. He made use of two types of wood – beech and pine – mainly for the way they complement each other. Four months later, on May 18, the hyperrealistic motorcycle was completed."

Head over to Oddity Central for additional photos of Yuri Hvtisishvili’s fantastic wooden motorcycle.

peth

zeezrom:

 “The Pink Lady of Malibu”

"On October 29, 1966, a massive 60-foot-tall painting of a nude pink lady holding flowers suddenly appeared as you headed into the tunnel on Malibu Canyon Road.

As word of the massive pink lady spread, and the traffic on the highway grew to a halt, city officials decided “The Pink Lady” had to be removed. Firefighters were called to hosing her off the rocks. It didn’t work. Buckets of paint thinner were thrown on the rocks.  It only made her pink skin pinker.

As county officials worked on figuring out a way to remove The Pink Lady, a 31-year-old paralegal from Northridge, a woman named Lynne Seemayer, suddenly showed up on the road and admitted that she was the artist who did the piece. 

Seemayer said that she was annoyed by the graffiti that was all over the canyon wall (“Valley Go Home” was a memorable slogan) and so, over a 10 month period, she started to secretly climb up under the moonlight and suspended herself by ropes to remove the graffiti.

At 8 P. M. on October 28 Seemayer painted the Pink Lady using ordinary house paint. By dawn it was done. 

The Pink Lade lasted only a week. Seemayer sued LA county for $1 million for the destruction of her work, and the county counter-sued for $28,000 in removal costs. Since the painting was on private property, both cases were dismissed by the court.

On Thursday, November 3, workers covered the painting with 14 gallons of brown paint.”

http://www.woostercollective.com/post/the-story-of-the-pink-lady-of-malibu

tballardbrown
It still surprises me that a few of my colleagues who regularly attend music festivals like Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival and Budweiser Made in America still haven’t heard of, or don’t seem to know much about, the annual Essence Festival, held every July 4th weekend in New Orleans at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome. Given that the Festival is now celebrating its 20th anniversary and pulling in record numbers of attendees, that benign neglect is not only a crying shame — it’s a kind of organized ignorance.
lakotapeopleslawproject
lakotapeopleslawproject:

We would like to thank our members for all of their support! Without their generosity, our vision of foster care run by Lakota, for Lakota would not become a reality. If you’d still like to become a member go to http://lakota.cc/1kvf8ka.So far, we have raised $3,000 in recurring donations. This helps to finance our office and employees in Rapid City, South Dakota. Because of this we are able to continue pursuing the solution for Native American foster children in South Dakota.To date, the Lakota People’s Law Project, with the support of generous donors and allies, have made some remarkable accomplishments towards our ultimate goal! After eight years of diligent work by Lakota grandmothers, a 2011 national expose by National Public Radio, and scrutiny by Congress, the State of South Dakota has finally relented its position that it is more apt than tribes to provide for Native children. Governor Daugaard (2013) stated that he supports the transfer of all federal monies previously provided to the State of South Dakota for Indian child and family services to the tribes. This funding comes from Title IV of the Social Security Act, which governs “grants to states for Aid and Services to Needy Families with Children and for Child–Welfare Services.” It is a challenge for the tribes to qualify for these programs because they have to spend money planning and developing their program before they can submit an application to transfer federal funding from the state to the tribe. Six Lakota tribes have already begun this application process, using experts and their own specially-qualified tribal members, and one of the nine Lakota tribes has already received such a Planning Grant.There are still many challenges to face and much ground to cover in this process, but we are making headway. It is because of our members and other supporters that these accomplishments have been possible. Thank you again for all of your help!

lakotapeopleslawproject:

We would like to thank our members for all of their support! Without their generosity, our vision of foster care run by Lakota, for Lakota would not become a reality. If you’d still like to become a member go to http://lakota.cc/1kvf8ka.

So far, we have raised $3,000 in recurring donations. This helps to finance our office and employees in Rapid City, South Dakota. Because of this we are able to continue pursuing the solution for Native American foster children in South Dakota.

To date, the Lakota People’s Law Project, with the support of generous donors and allies, have made some remarkable accomplishments towards our ultimate goal!
After eight years of diligent work by Lakota grandmothers, a 2011 national expose by National Public Radio, and scrutiny by Congress, the State of South Dakota has finally relented its position that it is more apt than tribes to provide for Native children. Governor Daugaard (2013) stated that he supports the transfer of all federal monies previously provided to the State of South Dakota for Indian child and family services to the tribes. This funding comes from Title IV of the Social Security Act, which governs “grants to states for Aid and Services to Needy Families with Children and for Child–Welfare Services.” It is a challenge for the tribes to qualify for these programs because they have to spend money planning and developing their program before they can submit an application to transfer federal funding from the state to the tribe. Six Lakota tribes have already begun this application process, using experts and their own specially-qualified tribal members, and one of the nine Lakota tribes has already received such a Planning Grant.

There are still many challenges to face and much ground to cover in this process, but we are making headway. It is because of our members and other supporters that these accomplishments have been possible. Thank you again for all of your help!